Silver Linings

Although there is much sadness to write about, I want to share a happy story. A happy story that had me shedding tears of love, gratitude & happiness. 

Jean-Sébastien wrote the post below on Facebook yesterday morning. Kelly, Scott, Jaymarie and I had been in chatting with him and Jan and the rest of the gang from Clowns Without Borders before our ferry trip to Chios. 

This restaurant has been my favorite on Lesvos this past week. My first night I didn’t have enough cash to cover my bill and they don’t take cards. The owner told me to pay it when I had it. I did, of course, the next night when I went for dinner 😊

Here is Jean-Sébastien’s post:

Last night, here in lesbos, in the restaurant or we have our habits with the team of “clowns without borders” – a traditional restaurant Greek held by two twin brothers who cooks so well and for nothing (fresh tuna steak 300 G + accompaniment for 6,50 €!?) -‘s arrival a first family of Syrian refugees, then a 2th, then a 3th, 4th, 5th…

One of the bosses asked my friend Sabine Choucair, Lebanese Clown, come and translate the map in Arabic. She’s so grown from family to family for their describe the menu, and little by little, the tables were covered with large plates full of food warm and abundant.

The faces tired and anxious are relaxed, the mouths are untied.

The restaurant to finished by bleed out, and we found “between us”, The team of the restaurant, the team of clowns and a Syrian family.

We communicated as we could in Greek, English, Arabic. Little by little we bonded, and I could even play with one of their son, Omar, who barely a few hours earlier, soaked in the arms of his mother, trying not to die drowned in a rubber boat overcrowded.

Omar was very serene, very inquisitive, full of energy, to move the legs in its combination too big for him, but dry at least.

He has even offered a few big smiles, these smiles that are so beautiful that your heart opens all alone, whether you like it or not.

Omar has 3 months, and Omar’s fine.

Omar is the European tomorrow, with all due respect to all those who close their arms.

Welcome my grand, ahla w ‘ Sahla, welcome!

PS: when parents have wanted to pay the bill, the boss has refused. All is not lost in this complicated world…

All is not lost.

 

Jean-Sébastien and Omar, Lesvos, Greece


My dear readers, all is not lost ❤️

Ciao! 

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Day 2 

Day 2

Still on flight to Rome. Watched the documentary “He Named Me Malala”. Powerful story about not only Malala, but her amazing, heroic father, both whom spoke out against the Taliban. 

0912: Landed in Rome

0921: cleared immigration and customs

0935: checked the two big bags with supplies in to luggage storage at airport. No sense in schlepping them around. 

0950: on bus headed to main Termini in Rome. 

Rome Airport = most efficient international airport I’ve been through!

Napped from 1-3 and then a walk about town. 

Dinner next door to hostel. They had gluten free pasta!! So I had carbonara sauce. Oh my, so good!

As I was leaving restaurant I met Sarah and her son Sam. Brits living in Turkey. Literally on the coast just opposite to where I am going in Lesvos. There are no coincidences. 

A lovely chat with my new friend Rita from Lithuania. She’s on a short holiday to Rome. I am always amazed at how much Europeans know about our U.S. Politics, probably more than a lot of our young folks know. Both Sarah and Rita are concerned about the negative impact Donald Trump would have on our world if he were to become president. I concur. 

In bed and sound asleep by 10 pm. I awoke at 435 and ended up in a WhatsApp chat with Aisha, back to sleep around 6 and slept until 930. More tomorrow!

And if you are willing donations for the refugees can be made here: https://www.youcaring.com/sandra-blankenship-480179#

Or by PayPal: flamidwyfe1@aol.com

Ciao!